2017 Ecology Ottawa’s tree giveaway : species-specific instructions

Ecology Ottawa is embarking on our largest tree giveaway in Ottawa’s history! We are giving away nine different types of trees throughout summer.
Thank you if you already have your tree sapling and here are some characteristics about your tree that you are about to plant!

If you got a white spruce, keep in mind what your tree likes :

  • Moisture: Tolerates a range of moisture levels.Picea_glauca_tree.jpg
  • Shade: Full sun is the ideal condition for this tree, meaning it should get at least six hours of direct, unfiltered sunlight each day but it tolerates shade.
  • Soil: The white spruce grows in acidic, loamy, moist, sandy, well-drained and clay soils. It has some drought tolerance.
  • The white spruce grows to a height of 40–60′ and a spread of 10–20′ at maturity.

picea glauca.jpg

 

 

If you got a blue spruce (also called Colorado spruce), opt for :

319px-Picea_pungens_tree

 

  • Moisture: Tolerates a range of moisture levels.
  • Shade: Full sun is the ideal condition for this tree, meaning it should get at least six hours of direct, unfiltered sunlight each day.
  • Soil: The Colorado blue spruce adapts well to many soils—growing in acidic, loamy, moist, rich, sandy, well-drained and clay soils. It requires normal moisture with moderate tolerance to flooding and drought.
  • The Colorado blue spruce grows to a height of 50–75′ and a spread of 10–20′ at maturity.

 

 

If you chose a white pine, don’t forget :white pine.jpg

  • Moisture: Tolerates different moisture levels.
  • Shade: Full sun and partial shade are best for this tree, meaning it prefers a mini
    mum of four hours of direct, unfiltered sunlight each day.
  • Soil: The eastern white pine grows in acidic, moist, well-drained and dry soils. While it does best in moist soil, the tree can has been known to tolerate everything from dry, rocky ridges to bogs.
  • The eastern white pine grows to a height of 50–80′ and a spread of 20–40′ at maturity.

 

 

 

If you have a white cedar, you should know :

white cedar.jpg

 

 

Moisture: Prefers moist soil.
Shade: Tolerates shade.
Soil: It mostly grows on calcareous soils that are neutral or nearly so. Although it grows best on well-drained sites, it may be dominant in swamps. In cultivation, it grows in a wide variety of soils.
This medium-sized tree grows to a height of 25 to 50 feet, and a diameter of 1 to 2 feet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you are ready to plant your hard maple (or sugar maple), keep in mind :

hard maple.jpg

 

  • Moisture: It prefers moist soil conditions but has moderate drought tolerance.
  • Shade: Full sun and partial shade.
  • Soil: The sugar maple grows in deep, well-drained, acidic to slightly alkaline soil.
  • The sugar maple tree grows to a height of 60–75′ and a spread of 40–50′ at maturity.

 

 

 

 

A red maple requires:

red maple.jpg

 

Moisture: naturally occurs in low wet sites.
Shade: Full sun is the ideal condition for this tree.
Soil: The red maple grows in acidic, loamy, moist, rich, sandy, silty loam, well-drained and clay soils.
The red maple grows to a height of 40–60′ and a spread of around 40′ at maturity.

 

 

 

 

If you received a yellow birch, you need :

 

yellow birch.jpg

 

  • Moisture: Prefers moist soil.
  • Shade: Full sun and partial shade.
  • Soil: The Yellow Birch grows in acidic, alkaline, loamy, moist, rich, sandy, silty loam, well drained soils.
  • The Yellow Birch grows to be 60′ – 75′ feet in height.

 

 

If you have a white birch, your tree needs :

 

white pine 2.0.jpg

 

Moisture: tolerates diverse environmental conditions.
Shade: Full sun and partial shade.
Soil: grows well in moist soils

The paper birch grows to a height of 50–70′ and a spread of around 35′ at maturity.

 

 

red pine.jpg

 

If you have a red pine :

 

  • Moisture: native to areas with cool-to-warm summers, cold winters, and low to moderate precipitation.
  • Shade: Full sun is the ideal condition for this tree.
  • Soil: Natural stands of red pine are confined largely to sandy soils.
  • Height of 70′-80′ on good sites

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Categories: Tree News

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